Molly Longman

The sports injuries that keep physiotherapists in business

The sports injuries that keep physiotherapists in business

Published February 04 2016

Physiotherapy plays a major role in the multi-disciplinary approach to the management of sports injuries. Basically, when David Beckham tears his Achilles tendon, it’s the physiotherapists to the rescue.  They work with athletes post-operatively to prevent any further injuries and help them back onto the field, the court, the balance beam – you name it – as quickly and safely as possible.

Here on the Hotcourses editorial desk, we were pretty enchanted by the idea of getting the chance to work with Wimbledon and World Cup wonders every day. Luckily for us (and, potentially, for Beckham), our site offers loads of information about how to get into the field.  Here are a few examples of the worst injuries physiotherapists treat on a regular basis.

 

Torn ulnar collateral ligament (UCL)

The UCL can become stretched, torn or frayed due to stress of repetitive throwing motions. Though this injury is most common among pitchers, some javelin, football, racquet sports, ice hockey and water polo athletes also report the injury. Physiotherapists help the recovery process and are involved in post-surgical rehabilitation, non-surgical treatment and arthroscopic debridement.

Image via netdna.com

 

Torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)

An athlete certainly can’t hit his knees and pray for the healing of this awful knee injury – but he can call a physiotherapist. Torn ACLs in the world of athletics are about as common as a uni-student in a Sainsbury’s. It occurs due to constant, quick changes in direction that are rehabilitating to the knees. The average injury takes approximately a year of therapy before a full recovery is possible.

Torn ACL
Image via prestigesportsmedicine.com

 

Hamstring injuries

The hamstring is located in the posterior thigh and is frequently injured among athletes – must just come in with strains, though some with partial or complete tears in the muscles. Depending  on the extent of the tear or strain, physiotherapists advise their patients to work through a series of stretches and exercise programmes tailored specifically to their injury.

Hamstring tear
Image via sinewtherapeutics.com

 

Achilles Tendonitis

When the Achilles tendon is injured, athletes frequently first experience pain in the back of the ankle. The tendon connects the two major calf muscles, gastrocnemius and soleus to the back of the heel bone. These injuries are common among runners, dancers, and tennis players. Physiotherapy treatment is an important component of the healing process. Treatment often comprises soft tissue massages, electrotherapy, stretches, ice or heat treatment.

foot and ankle
Image via footandankle-bh.com

 

Hip Bursitis

Hip Bursitis is a condition that causes pain on the side of the hip and is typically characterized by tissue damage and inflammation of the trochanteric bursa. Repetitive running or walking, jumping, squatting, lunging activities, or excessive side-lying can cause this condition. Some of the physio-treatment regimens used to treat the condition are massages, joint mobilization, stretches, ice or heat treatment, and activity modification advice.

Hip
Image via blogspot.com

 

Molly Longman

Molly is a student at London College of Fashion, and is our current editorial intern. Her passions lie in writing, running, and eating peanut butter straight from the jar. She loves to learn (almost as much as she loves her dog), so she’s devoted to providing you with the best information on courses to help you become a better you.