Why cooking matters
 
 
Safeera Sarjoo

Why cooking matters

How cooking affects us

First published date June 21 2017 Amended date June 21 2017

When most people think about cooking, they either dread it or look forward to the finished product. But how often do you think about why cooking matters and how it's helping more than just our stomach?

In school Food Tech was a subject that most of us felt wasn't entirely necessary but little did we know it vastly improved aspects of our self esteem and our outside of the box thinking. Did I produce gourmet food? No. Do I accept failure more graciously? Absolutely.

So, whether you’ve always wanted to learn the art of chocolate making or even how to master a simple bake, we can guarantee you’ll learn the following about yourself through a cookery course.

You’ll build confidence

It can be quite scary tackling a classic dish or something completely fresh and modern. The most important thing is to try and see how you do. When you take a cookery class, no one is expecting you to be Gordon Ramsey. Everyone’s there to learn and to pick up the same skill and the more practice you have, the more confidence you will gain.

A word of advice when it comes to taking a cookery course is to practice what you’ve learnt fairly soon afterwards. That way you can independently try what you’ve been taught without feeling any pressure or competition - not that there will be in a cooking class - and you can improve on techniques that you may feel you struggle with.

You learn how to get creative

Once you’ve built your confidence and are happy with the basics of your chosen cookery craft, this is where the fun starts! You can start experimenting with flavours, textures, completely different ingredients! Getting creative will help you build a sense of fearlessness when it comes tackling the most challenging dishes in the kitchen.

Time management and organisation is key

The more elements there are to a recipe, the more your time management and organisation will be tested. This can be quite stressful but it teaches you how to prioritise, the importance of thinking ahead and ensuring you’re working in a very methodical manner. Perfecting your time management will always stand you in good stead because it’s so crucial in other parts of our lives. Whether that’s work or our own passion projects.

You work on your patience

Impatience will not do you any good in the kitchen, after all, you can’t rush perfection. There are instances where certain dishes and ingredients will take time to cook and you simply have to let them be. If you’re tempted to rush the process be prepared for a less than stellar result. Instead, why not set a timer and use this time to get other tasks done, which will keep your mind off your oven and cooker. It’s probably one of the most underrated qualities, but being patient is widely admired and actually feels good exhibiting – whether it’s in the kitchen or in a professional environment.

Cooking refreshes knowledge in other subjects        

The last skill I thought I would need when cooking is maths. However, it comes in incredibly useful when you need to adapt measurements if you’re cooking for more people than what’s stated on a recipe. It may seem like no big deal but I can’t think of anything worst than not having enough food for people who may even want second helpings. Other talents in art may come in useful if you’re decorating a show stopper cake or presenting a dish.

 

 

We’re confident you’ll find the cookery course you’re looking for. Whether you want to master a particular cuisine or simply want an introductory course to the world of cooking, you can start your search here and watch your culinary journey begin!  

Safeera Sarjoo

Safeera is Editor of Hotcourses and a journalist from Kingston University. Always the inquisitive, her writing spans across a number of areas such as sustainability, fashion, lifestyle and now education. Her belief that you never stop learning and passionate nature has taken her to New York City as part of her degree and across the airwaves on national radio talking about the issues that matter to her.